Class Schedule

Week 1, Tuesday, May 21st

Topic: Introduction to The Digital Past and Building a Web Presence

During Class:

  • Purchase a Student Plan ($30) from Reclaim Hosting
  • Take the Student Technology Survey
  • Tutorial of WordPress, plug-ins, and themes
  • Overview of Slack

Homework:

  • Read the following articles and write your first blog post. Who are you? What do you study? How did you become interested in your field? What was your online presence before this class and how do you hope this class and these two articles can help you manage your professional life online?
  • Review the following digital history projects and readings and be prepared to talk about them—at length—in class on Thursday.

Readings:

Projects to Review:

Week 1, Thursday, May 23rd

Topic: What is Digital History?

During Class:

  • Discuss DH projects from Tuesday’s Homework
  • Blog Presentations
  • Discuss Sustainability and Ethics
  • Troubleshoot WordPress Questions
  • Introduce “Little Odd Histories”
  • Review of University Library databases

Homework:

  • After completing your readings write a 3-part blog post.
    • Part 1: How do you define digital history?
    • Part 2: Discuss some of the problems of sustainability and ethics as described by the authors. But also, what are your thoughts?
    • Part 3: What are some ideas you want to look into for “Little Odd Histories”?
  • Review projects below. Browse History Bizarre and pick two entries to be ready to speak about in class.
  • Listen to Stuff You Missed in History Class podcast below.

Readings:

Projects to Review:

Week 2, Tuesday, May 28th

Topic: Metadata and Omeka

During Class:

  • Discuss Homework prompts and projects
  • Understanding Copyright Laws
  • Primary Sources and Metadata
  • Visit from Alyssa Fahringer, Digital Scholarship Consultant (DiSC)
    • Get Omeka Login Access
    • In class Omeka tutorial
  • Why is metadata important?
  • Narrowing down “Little Odd Histories Topic”
  • Where to look for Sources and Items

Homework:

  • Search online for exhibit items and be prepared to bring 3 of them into class on Thursday
  • Write a blog post about the challenges of finding relevant items and how that relates to copyright laws.
  • Think about your Omeka exhibit and how you want your items to contribute to the class “museum.”

Readings:

Projects to Review:

  • Last Seen: Finding Family After Slavery
  • Colored Conventions: Bringing Nineteenth-Century Black Organizing to Digital Life
  • Baltimore ’68: Riots and Rebirth
  • The Legacies of George Mason
  • The Enslaved Children of George Mason

Week 2, Thursday, May 30th

Topic: Metadata and Omeka Continued

During Class:

  • Presentation on Omeka topic and current items
  • In-class workshop of Omeka project
    • Find additional exhibit items
    • Work on exhibit pages
    • Discuss exhibit writing

Homework:

  • Omeka Projects are due Sunday, June 2nd at 10 pm. All Omeka accounts will be suspended until the projects can be graded and presented to the class.
  • Write a blog post about your experience creating an exhibit and be sure to include a hyperlink to your Omeka exhibit.
  • Review Readings and Projects. Be ready to discuss in class.

Readings:

  • Daniel J. Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig, “Becoming Digital: Why Digitize the Past? Costs and Benefits,” Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past, 2005
  • Stephanie Seal Walters, “Study Early America? You should Look at the Loyalist Claims,” 2017
  • The Smithsonian Want You!
  • Jan Zastrow, “Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage: ‘Citizen Archivists’ for the Future, The Digital Archivist,” October 2014
  • Katie Notopoulos, “Ancestry.com is in Cahoots with Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects,” Buzzfeed News, October 2018

Projects to Review:

  • Papers of the War Department
  • Transcribe Virginia
  • Old Weather
  • The Mississippi Community Cookbook Project
  • New York Public Library, Holiday Postcards

Week 3, Tuesday, June 4th

 

Topic: Digitization and Crowdsourced Transcriptions

During Class:

  • Overview of Digitizing Historical Documents/Items
    • Tools used
    • What purpose does it serve?
  • Why does digitization take time?
  • com and Digitization Ethics
  • Tour of Fenwick Archives Digitization
  • Crowdsourced Transcription Projects

Homework:

  • Choose a document from the Papers of the War Department site to transcribe and submit. Copy your transcription before submitting and e-mail it to Professor Walters with a copy of the document by 10 pm on Sunday, June 9th.
  • Write a blog post about the transcription process. Was it easy? Difficult? How well did you understand the handwritten document? Did this exercise give you any insight into how long it should take for crowdsourced transcription projects to be completed?

Readings:

Projects to Review:

Week 3, Thursday, June 6th

Topic: OCR, Text-Mining, and Topic Modeling

During Class:

  • OCR and how it is used
  • Group Project:
    • Compare original document to OCR
    • Clean up OCR—will be turned in
  • Explore Google NGram and Voyant

Homework:

  • Next class, we will discuss digitizing historical documents and the efforts to get them online and transcribed. Read the articles and examine the projects below. Write a blog post discussing why historical documents should be published online. Should there be a paywall for viewing these documents? How does digitization affect libraries and archives? What are the positives and negatives of digitization?

Readings:

  • Sara Bond, “How is Digital Mapping Changing the Way We Visualize Racism and Segregation?” Forbes, October 20, 2017.
  • Elijah Meeks and Karl Grossner, “Modeling Networks and Scholarship with ORBIS,” Journal of Digital Humanities, 2012.
  • Richard White, “What is Spatial History?”
  • Lincoln Mullen, “Data Maps”

Projects to Review:

  • Mapping the Letters of the Republic
  • Visualizing Emancipation
  • The Negro Travelers’ Green Book
  • ORBIS 

Week 4, Tuesday, June 11th

Topic: Mapping and Historical Data

During Class:

  • Lightning round presentations of Omeka Exhibits (5 min per person/2 min for questions)
  • Mapping history and the humanities
  • Overview of mapping tools
    • Mapbox
    • Google Maps
    • StoryMap JS
  • Discussing StoryMap JS Data and Topics

Homework:

  • After reviewing the readings and the projects below, write a blog post on how mapping can be used to aid in telling the story of the “other” in historical narratives.
  • Sign up for a StoryMap JS account
  • Choose StoryMap JS Topic and write a rough outline of story/map (for personal use, not your blog).

Projects to Review:

  • Game of Thrones: Arya’s Journey
  • Hieronymus Bosch: Garden of Earthly Delights

 

Week 4, Thursday, June 13th

Topic: Workshopping StoryMap JS

During Class:

  • Discuss homework readings and mapping projects
  • Workshop StoryMap JS projects in class
    • Must include at least 6 places, including images
  • Lightning Round StoryMap JS DRAFT presentations (5 min per person)

Homework:

  • Work on StoryMap JS project and take into consideration comments made during lightning round presentations
  • StoryMap JS Project will be due by Sunday, June 16th at 10 pm.
  • Write a blog post about your experience using StoryMap JS and describe your experience. Is the tool user-friendly? Were you happy with your project? How could you use this for projects in the future?

Readings:

  • Network Analysis, the Historian’s Macroscope: Big Digital History
  • Lauren F Klein. “The Image of Absence: Archival Silence, Data Visualization, and James Hemings,” American Literature, 2013

Projects:

  • A Marriage Contract in Angouleme
  • The Economy of Privilege

Week 5, Tuesday, June 18th

Topic: Networks Analysis and Visualizations

During Class:

  • What is a Network Analysis?
  • Overview of Network Software:
    • Gephi
    • Palladio
  • Workshop in Palladio

Homework:

  • Complete your in-class Palladio workshop project. Provide screenshots of your network analysis and describe the relationships between your edges and nodes. Explain the historical information in the dataset provided in class. Then discuss how network analysis can help us better understand history, relationships, or specific eras

Projects to Review:

  • The Tattooed Historian Show—choose a podcast that has a topic you would enjoy most. Be ready to discuss the podcast you listened to in class.

 

Week 5, Thursday, June 20th

Topic: Podcasts

During Class:

  • Podcasts as a teaching tool
  • Popular Opensource Podcast Software
  • Presenting Research in the Digital Age: Guest Presentation and Q&A
    • The Tattooed Historian, John Heckman
  • Wrapping the Course Up

Homework:

  • Congrats! The course is over. Write one final blog post to about podcasting in the Humanities. Are they effective in terms of outreach? Is audience important?
  • Then write a section about this class. How do you feel on your last day? Did you learn anything important for your major—especially if your chosen specialty isn’t history?
  • Final blog post DUE: Saturday, June 22nd by 8:00 am