4 Comments

  1. Todd Ballance

    Could you either create a system adding up 1 through 7 points to certify credibility to loyalist title or create a system weighting certain of the number 1 through 7 differently suggesting some more correctly correlated with title of loyalist?

    • Hi Todd,

      That’s an excellent suggestion. I’d be more inclined to weigh the numbers 1-7. I’ve seen historians use a similar algorithm before. If not my 1-7, it might help me determine a weight system for the Loyalist Claims.

  2. Thomas A. Murray

    One major question that you may not of considered is whether a person had to actively oppose the rebellion or not. Within the united Empire Loyalists’ of Canada, for example, a debate has been whether Quakers were Loyalists. While these suffered losses, deprivations and exile they did not take up arms nor were they engaged in administrative duties. Would a firm and consistent commitment to the preservation of British rights and laws be a sufficient criteria to define a Loyalist?

    One fact I tend to agree with is that one had to be a resident of North America. There may be a few, rare exceptions. For example, regular troops had the option to settle in what are now the Maritime provinces and Ontario and Quebec, but they did not lose home and property due to the Revolution. That is their loyalty was based on a commitment to military service regardless of where or when. Since the Revolution was fundamentally a civil war, then it would be fundamentally those already resident in the geographically significant areas who would be either Loyalists or Patriots. My quibble with the UELAC is that they tend to limit that criterion to the 13 Colonies, I would include Nova Scotia (from whence came, I believe, some of the 84th Emigrant Highlanders). In the Maugerville area of what is now New Brunswick there were definitely some who supported the Patriots, took up arms and were intercepted before accomplishing their aims. These were considered rebels (i.e., Patriots) during and after; so would not those who suffered losses from incursions by privateers, for example, be entitled to be compensated for their loyalty?

    Thomas.

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